Quick Answer: What Should Original Gravity Be?

How do you calculate the original gravity?

Divide the total number of gravity points by the number of gallons of wort.

For the example above, lets assume this is a 6 gallon batch, so the wort will have 48.2 gravity points per gallon.

Take this number, add 1000 and divide by 1000, this value is your OG..

How many gravity points does sugar add?

Corn sugar yields 42 gravity points per pound per gallon (ppg) and is 100 percent fermentable.

What does high original gravity mean?

“High-gravity” refers to brewing a beer with high original gravity (OG)—typically, above 1.075 OG is considered high. OG is a measure of the fermentable and un-fermentable substances in the wort before fermentation.

What if my original gravity is too low?

Correcting Your Original Gravity If your gravity is too low, the calculation for the amount of dry extract to add is: Calculate the difference between your target and actual OG, then multiply by 1000. For example if you were targeting 1.056, but only hit 1.048 this would give us (1.056-1.048) x 1000 = 8 points.

What is original gravity?

Original Gravity (OG), sometimes called original extract, is a measure of the solids content originally in the wort, before alcoholic fermentation has commenced to produce the beer. OG is one of the major measurements used by brewers to determine the future alcohol content of a beer fermented from a particular wort.

What is original gravity and final gravity?

Original gravity (OG) measures how much sugar is present in the wort before it is fermented. The final gravity (FG) is how much sugar is left over when fermentation is done.

What affects original gravity?

A number of factors impact brewhouse efficiency and therefore impact the original gravity reading these include; the amount of sugars in the fermentables (total PPG), volume of each fermentable, the temperature rests of the mash schedule, mash pH, and total boil time.

What if my original gravity is too high?

If the gravity is too high, dilute it by adding boiled or sterile water: This time we’ll assume our target was 1.056 but we overshot and came in with a gravity of 1.064, again using a 5 gallon batch. We’ll use the fact that the number of points times volume should be a constant to do the dilution.

What if my final gravity is too high?

If your final gravity is much higher than expected, make sure that the beer has actually finished fermenting. Give it some more time, then check the gravity again. If it stays the same, then you should look more closely.